Q&A with Simon Pegg and Karl Urban

For a summer blockbuster, this film has some really nice, quiet character moments.
I don’t think you can watch a film that is full of explosions and care about it if you don’t have some care about the people that it is happening to.

Q&A with Ruben Östlund

How did the idea of the script develop from the art piece of the square?
Ruben Östlund: The whole idea of the script developed in 2008. I don’t like to talk about it as an art piece but instead of as a humanistic traffic sign, actually.

Q&A with Ralph Ineson, Anya Taylor-Joy, Robert Eggers

There’s an incredible attention to detail throughout the film, from the dialog to the set decoration. Could you describe how you approached these aspects of the film?
Robert Eggers: New England was the most literate part of the Western World; you had to teach your children how to read– it was against the law if you didn’t, because you had to read the bible in English.

Q&A with Michael Fassbender

When an actor does Macbeth on stage, they get to experience the character straight through. How was it playing it in a film?
It’s just a normal thing, really. It’s such a rare opportunity to do something in chronological order when filming; it just never really happens.

Q&A with Luke Wilson, Austin Abrams, and Mike White

You’re a prolific writer, but this is only your second time directing a feature. What motivates you to direct one of your own pieces?
Mike White: I knew the tone was going to be particular, so it was just going to be hard to help another director interpret what I intended for film to be.

Q&A with Joey Kuhn and Kimberly Parker

Can you talk about some of the sources of inspiration for this film?
Joey Kuhn: I’ll start with the emotional inspiration for the film: In college, I accidentally fell in love with my gay best friend, and was afraid to tell him for years.

Q&A with Jeff Nichols, Joel Edgerton, and Ruth Negga

What was the research process like, preparing to play such a quiet man with a strong presence?
Joel Edgerton: For Ruth and I, the documentary became a road map for us to think about the way we needed to look and how we needed to carry ourselves.

Q&A with J.C. Chandor and Robert Redford

Why did you want to be in this film?
Redford: Because he asked me! In all honesty, I’ve spent many years building an organization to promote independent film, and yet no one has asked me to work in their film.