Q&A with Steve Coogan, Sophie Kennedy Clark, and Philomena Lee

How did you come across the book and what compelled you to champion this project?
Coogan: I was in New York making a film. And because my career’s been in comedy—I’ve written a lot of television comedy— I wanted to find something more substantial, that had more substance.

Q&A with Saoirse Ronan and Greta Gerwig

One of the most priceless moments in the film is when Lady Bird escapes from the car. What was it like putting that scene together?
Greta Gerwig: That scene was such a monster on the page because there are so many emotions.

Q&A with Pamela Romanowsky

How did you get involved with this project?
I came to this book as a casual reader. I got it from the same bookstore you see James [Franco] signing books in at the start of the movie.

Q&A with Luke Wilson, Austin Abrams, and Mike White

You’re a prolific writer, but this is only your second time directing a feature. What motivates you to direct one of your own pieces?
Mike White: I knew the tone was going to be particular, so it was just going to be hard to help another director interpret what I intended for film to be.

Q&A with Laura Linney and Ian McKellen

How do you approach these two very different characters who are the same person?
With excitement, because it’s a nice challenge. To play an older man, and then a younger man.

Q&A with John Krasinski

How did you get on this project? How did it come to you?
John Krasinski: So I was about to start pre-production on Jack Ryan, and some of the producers on Jack Ryan were Platinum Dunes, and they said, “Would you ever act in a genre movie?” And I said, “Oh no, I can’t do that, I don’t do horror movies.”

Q&A with James Mangold and Jenno Topping

Can you talk about what it was like to craft these characters?
James Mangold: I’m a big believer in hanging out. I am not a big believer in rehearsing.

Q&A with Finola Dwyer, Saoirse Ronan, and John Crowley

What in your own life has helped you connect with the story?
John Crowley: I moved to London when I was 27 to direct a play at the National Theatre. Having been back and forth from London since I was about ten, I knew London better than I knew Dublin.

Q&A with Edgar Wright

How did you translate the stage direction into the performance?
Edgar Wright: When I gave the script to the actors, they had all of the music as well, so they could read the script with the right music playing.

Q&A with David Lowery

What was it like working on Pete’s Dragon while writing A Ghost Story?
David Lowery: The script was only thirty pages and I sent it to my producer friends, saying, “let’s make this.”

Q&A with Alan Hicks, Justin Kauflin, and Paula DuPré Pesmen

Mr. Kauflin, what was your reaction when you were approached about being in this film?
Kauflin: When Al asked me that, we had already known each other for a few years; he was a good buddy of mine. I knew he was a great drummer, and apparently he’s a good surfer as well.