Q&A with Saoirse Ronan and Greta Gerwig

One of the most priceless moments in the film is when Lady Bird escapes from the car. What was it like putting that scene together?
Greta Gerwig: That scene was such a monster on the page because there are so many emotions.

Q&A with Ryan Fleck, Anna Boden, and Ryan Reynolds

What was it about the riverboat casinos in Iowa that compelled you to write this story?
It was really interesting to see the anti-glamorous version of a casino. There was a story in there somewhere that we hadn’t seen on film before.

Q&A with Morgan Neville

The letter’s from a five year old boy and it says, “Dear Mr. Rogers, are you for real? Are you for real or not?”

Q&A with Matt Ross and Viggo Mortensen

There was such incredible chemistry amongst the cast. How did you build that? What was the rehearsal process?
Viggo Mortensen: Early on, which was great and doesn’t always happen, Matt brought me into read with the last couple of kids we were casting.

Q&A with Martin Scorsese, Robert De Niro, and Al Pacino

This film has a different editorial pace and perspective than you usually portray in your films. Would you be able to talk about your approach with these older men in the film?
Martin Scorsese: This is not a film we could have created or made as effectively if we had tried to make it ten years ago.

Q&A with John Krasinski

How did you get on this project? How did it come to you?
John Krasinski: So I was about to start pre-production on Jack Ryan, and some of the producers on Jack Ryan were Platinum Dunes, and they said, “Would you ever act in a genre movie?” And I said, “Oh no, I can’t do that, I don’t do horror movies.”

Q&A with Jeff Nichols, Joel Edgerton, and Ruth Negga

What was the research process like, preparing to play such a quiet man with a strong presence?
Joel Edgerton: For Ruth and I, the documentary became a road map for us to think about the way we needed to look and how we needed to carry ourselves.