Q&A with Wyck Godfrey, Josh Boone, Shailene Woodley, Laura Dern, Ansel Elgort

This movie is based on a beloved book by John Green. Has he seen the film and how does he feel about it?
Godfrey: He saw it very early on and was involved in the production, and loved it, thank god. But I think he knew all along from the screenplay to the casting that we were putting together a team that loved the book as deeply as its fans and that we were going to pay honor to it in whatever way we could.

Q&A with Writer/Director Ryan Coogler, Michael B. Jordan, Octavia Spencer, and Melonie Diaz

You all shot for a few nights on the actual BART platform where this tragedy took place. Can you talk about that experience?
Diaz: It was one of the most intense things. You can still feel the ghosts there, the presence of the pain and violence and fear and everything that went down that night. That day was special. We started off with a prayer. It was powerful.

Q&A with Wes Anderson, Ralph Fiennes, Tony Revolori

Talk about the inspiration for this piece.
Anderson: There’s this writer Stefan Zweig, who I had never heard of up until six or seven years ago. I read “Beware of Pity” – which I loved – and I thought about trying to adapt this book. But then I read more of his fiction and I kind of liked many of the pieces, and then his memoir, “The World of Yesterday,” ended up inspiring the whole setting of the movie. So I ultimately decided to do something Zweig-like, instead of adapting only one of them.

Q&A with Toni Collette and Ari Aster

This is something of a personal story, correct?
Ari Aster: The beautiful thing about genre filmmaking and the horror genre in general is that you can take a personal story or feeling that you need to work through and push it through this filter

Q&A with Steve Coogan, Sophie Kennedy Clark, and Philomena Lee

How did you come across the book and what compelled you to champion this project?
Coogan: I was in New York making a film. And because my career’s been in comedy—I’ve written a lot of television comedy— I wanted to find something more substantial, that had more substance.

Q&A with Steve Carell and Adam McKay

What drew you to this story?
Adam McKay: We had done a movie with Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg called The Other Guys, and the goal of that movie was to do a comedic parable of the collapse.

Q&A with Simon Pegg and Karl Urban

For a summer blockbuster, this film has some really nice, quiet character moments.
I don’t think you can watch a film that is full of explosions and care about it if you don’t have some care about the people that it is happening to.

Q&A with Sienna Miller and James Gray

Can you discuss the process of adapting the book for the screen?
James Gray: The book is a meticulously researched thing. Immediately you realize that you’re in for it if you change something factually and of course I had to, because it’s a movie.