Q&A with Saoirse Ronan and Greta Gerwig

One of the most priceless moments in the film is when Lady Bird escapes from the car. What was it like putting that scene together?
Greta Gerwig: That scene was such a monster on the page because there are so many emotions.

Q&A with Ryan Fleck, Anna Boden, and Ryan Reynolds

What was it about the riverboat casinos in Iowa that compelled you to write this story?
It was really interesting to see the anti-glamorous version of a casino. There was a story in there somewhere that we hadn’t seen on film before.

Q&A with Ruben Östlund

How did the idea of the script develop from the art piece of the square?
Ruben Östlund: The whole idea of the script developed in 2008. I don’t like to talk about it as an art piece but instead of as a humanistic traffic sign, actually.

Q&A with Ridley Scott

You used classic filmmaking techniques, especially in the opening scene. Can you talk about shooting it?
Scott: These storms are absolutely disgustingly filthy, and we had real fifth in the air. You have a real mix of dust.

Q&A with Ramin Bahrani and Michael Shannon

How did you come to this story, and what was the writing process?
Bahrani: I was interested in this whole world-turned-upside-down issue during the economic crisis. The focus was housing.

Q&A with Ralph Ineson, Anya Taylor-Joy, Robert Eggers

There’s an incredible attention to detail throughout the film, from the dialog to the set decoration. Could you describe how you approached these aspects of the film?
Robert Eggers: New England was the most literate part of the Western World; you had to teach your children how to read– it was against the law if you didn’t, because you had to read the bible in English.

Q&A with Quentin Tarantino, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Walton Goggins, and Kurt Russell

The following questions and answers are excerpted from a conversation that followed the NBR screening of The Hateful Eight.  Where did the idea for this film come from? Quentin Tarantino: It started because while I didn’t really want to write a sequel to Django, I did like the idea of maybe a series of paperback books like […]

Q&A with Pat Healy

In Compliance, you were the sadist, the controller. There are very similar themes here but in this case you’re on the other side.
It’s kind of interesting. In Great World of Sound, I almost play a version of the Ann Dowd character from Compliance.

Q&A with Parker Posey and Jamie Blackley

How did missing certain parts of the script before shooting influence you?
Parker Posey: I came on set thinking the film was one way — kind of light fare — and I sort of had water thrown on me by Woody: He immediately told me that she’s a suffering, lonely woman; she’s very unhappy.

Q&A with Pamela Romanowsky

How did you get involved with this project?
I came to this book as a casual reader. I got it from the same bookstore you see James [Franco] signing books in at the start of the movie.