Q&A with J.C. Chandor, Jessica Chastain, and Oscar Isaac

Mr. Chandor, why did you want to bring this story to the screen?
It was sort of two ideas that ran into each other. There was this core story that I had been working on for many years – probably six or seven years, actually – about a husband and wife who ran a business together.

Q&A with J.C. Chandor and Robert Redford

Why did you want to be in this film?
Redford: Because he asked me! In all honesty, I’ve spent many years building an organization to promote independent film, and yet no one has asked me to work in their film.

Q&A with Gus Van Sant, Kim Gordon, and Jonah Hill

What are the origins of the script?
Gus Van Sant: I live in Portland, Oregon. I had moved there, I think, in 1982. I had made a couple of films, and John Callahan was a visible, local character.

Q&A with Gia Coppola and Nat Wolff

The film is based on a book of short stories by James Franco. Can you tell us about how the project developed?
Coppola: James and I met up randomly – I had seen him at a deli and then later that night I ran into him again.

Q&A with Finola Dwyer, Saoirse Ronan, and John Crowley

What in your own life has helped you connect with the story?
John Crowley: I moved to London when I was 27 to direct a play at the National Theatre. Having been back and forth from London since I was about ten, I knew London better than I knew Dublin.

Q&A with Ethan Hawke and Paul Schrader

What was the genesis of this film?
Paul Schrader: The process began about three years ago when I was giving an award for Pawel Pawlikowski, for his film Ida at the New York Society of Film Critics.

Q&A with Emma Thompson

How much fun was it to play someone that rude?
It was bliss, of course, because I think we were all far too well brought up. From very early on we’re encouraged to say ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ to everyone for no good reason, and of course for things we don’t actually want.