Q&A with Steve Carell and Adam McKay

What drew you to this story?
Adam McKay: We had done a movie with Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg called The Other Guys, and the goal of that movie was to do a comedic parable of the collapse.

Q&A with Pamela Romanowsky

How did you get involved with this project?
I came to this book as a casual reader. I got it from the same bookstore you see James [Franco] signing books in at the start of the movie.

Q&A with James Mangold and Jenno Topping

Can you talk about what it was like to craft these characters?
James Mangold: I’m a big believer in hanging out. I am not a big believer in rehearsing.

Q&A with J.C. Chandor, Jessica Chastain, and Oscar Isaac

Mr. Chandor, why did you want to bring this story to the screen?
It was sort of two ideas that ran into each other. There was this core story that I had been working on for many years – probably six or seven years, actually – about a husband and wife who ran a business together.

Q&A with Daveed Diggs and Rafael Casal

Can you talk about the collaboration between the two of you in terms of writing, producing, and performing this?
Rafael Casal: Yeah, Diggs, can you?
Daveed Diggs: I mean we’ve been working on this for ten years at this point with our two producing partners the whole time, Jess and Keith Calder.

Q&A with Adam Driver, Daniel J. Jones, Steven Soderbergh, and Scott Z. Burns

Your characters spends a lot of time in an underground room, and doesn’t interact with a wide variety of people. But you still manage to develop a building sense of urgency. Can you talk about that process?
Adam Driver: There is a kind of decorum that comes with being in that kind of space that I really related to. There is a withholding of emotion, because you are there to do a job and not to insert your opinion or to have a feeling that you can express to your higher ups.